In the Matter of the Ontario Heritage Act

Notice of Intent to Designate

The Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O., 1990, Chapter 0.18 as amended, provides that the Municipal Council may pass a by-law designating property within the boundaries of the municipality to be of cultural heritage value and interest. The Council of the Municipality of Chatham-Kent hereby gives Notice of Intent to designate the following:

Description of Property:

The property is located at 317 Queen Street, Community of Chatham, Chatham-Kent, legally described as Lots 22 to 23, Part of Lots 21 & 40, Plan 349.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest:

Historical/Associative (OHA Reg. 9/06):
The historical significance of the property located at 317 Queen Street in Chatham predates the construction of the building that was erected 111 years ago.

On September 12, 1844, a parcel of land located near the southeast border of the Chatham city limits and Harwich Township was granted by the Crown by way of patent to Charles Wood. It was a triangular plot of land known as Park Lot A contained by Queen, Duluth and William Streets. The site remained as park land for 51 years until April 30, 1895 when it was purchased for $6,000 by Nathan H Stevens and Duncan McLachlan, two prominent Chatham residents.

At the time, Nathan Stevens was president of Canada Four Mills Co. serving also as Town Councillor, High School Trustee, Justice of the Peace, and eventually as Alderman while investing in area real estate. Mr. McLachlan was founder and president of the Canada Business College which had been operating upstairs in Urquhart Block on King Street, just west of the Merrill House.

One year later on June 3, 1896, McLachlan bought out Stevens for $300 and assumed the $6,000 mortgage. A baseball park was established on the site known as the "Old Athletic Grounds". A local baseball historian notes that home plate for the ball diamond was located where the existing building is and faced north toward the outfield bordered by Duluth Street.

It was on this baseball diamond that Hall of Fame baseball pitcher Rube Waddell played with a Chatham team. On June 2, 1898 it was the site of a historical game when, according to newspaper reports, Waddell pitched for Chatham against the Page Fence Giants, a club widely hailed as the best black team in the world at that time, in front of 1,200 fans. Waddell went on to star for Connie Mack's famed Philadelphia A's and to this date, still holds the American League strike-out record for a left-handed pitcher.

"The Athletic Park, though, proved to be a losing venture". By 1903, the enrollment in Canada Business College had swelled to over 300 students and a plan to construct a new building to house the college began in earnest. On April 4, 1903, Plan 349 was submitted to subdivide the vast property into 40 lots. Part of the plan included constructing a new street, College Street, to provide access to a quarter of the lots. It was on the corner of College and Queen, lots 21, 22, and 23, where McLaughlan decided to erect a new building for Canada Business College.

Canada Business College- Historical Significance to the City of Chatham

The Canada Business College was founded in 1876 by Duncan McLachlan and was opened for business in Chatham November 30th of that year with the enrollment of one pupil; Alexander McLachlan, a brother of Duncan. Duncan was a graduate of British American Business College at Toronto where he learned the fine art of penmanship.

The college grew rapidly both in enrollment and reputation, claiming to be "Canada's greatest school of shorthand and business training". "McLachlan seems to have been the pioneer, or one of the earliest pioneers, of such business training in Canada". Distinguished graduates of the college included Robert Gray, President of Wm. Gray and Sons Ltd.; W. H. Shaw, founder of Shaw Correspondence Schools; and James Westervelt, Principal of Forest City Business College, now known as Westervelt College in London, Ontario.

Arguably the most renowned person to have attended Canada Business College was the famous Canadian painter, Thomas Thomson, who inspired the "Group of Seven" self-proclaimed modern artists. "The two oldest Thomson boys, George and Henry, left the farm to enroll in Canada Business College in Chatham, Ontario. After quitting the foundry, Tom followed them there to train for a white-collar office job. It is not known if he finished the course, but in 1901 he was out of there and onto unknown pursuits…"

A New Building for Canada Business College

By 1904, Canada Business College had enrolled pupils from 138 cities, towns and hamlets; from six States in the United States; from Newfoundland; from thirty counties and districts of Ontario; and its graduates are to be found all over the world. It was the only business college in Canada to have continued three decades under the same management.

On July 8, 1905 the Chatham Daily Planet announced that after 30 years of operation, Canada Business College was beginning construction "at once" of a new building for opening in January of the following year at a cost of $10,000.

The college continued under McLachlan's ownership and management until his death when it was sold to Clarence B. Price on September 15, 1930 for $12,500. It remained in operation under Price's ownership and principalship for another 22 years. In total, Canada Business College attracted thousands of students to Chatham for 76 years before closing its doors.

On October 17, 1951 the Board of Education for the City of Chatham paid $100 to Clarence Price for an option to purchase the building. The option was never exercised.

CBC Building Becomes OPP Headquarters

As the Canada Business College era drew to a close, the historical building at 317 Queen found new purpose when the Ministry for Public Works for the Province of Ontario purchased the property from Clarence Price for $35,000 on March 24th, 1952.

The building was to become the headquarters of the Ontario Provincial Police as the Chatham Daily News announced on the front page of the March 11, 1952 edition.

Although the façade of the building remained relatively unchanged, the interior underwent modifications that included jail cells on the ground floor.

The building served as OPP Headquarters for the next 38 years until the detachment was moved to its current location at the corner of Park Ave and Sass Road in 1990.

Building Rebirth as Luxury Apartments

After the OPP moved out in 1990, the building sat empty for the next 8 years and Chatham was again at risk of losing another of its architectural heritage gems.

On February 20th, 1998, a company headed by long-time Chatham businessman Ted Wagenaar purchased the building and transformed it into ten luxury apartments while keeping the exterior largely unchanged from its 1905 debut. The building was renamed Chrysalis Manor and after 10 years of ownership Wagenaar sold to Earhard (Dean) Chung on February 29th, 2008. The building continued as Chrysalis Manor for the next five years until May 15th, 2013 when it was sold to the current owners.

The building has been rebranded as Queen's Court with a renewed commitment towards the restoration and preservation of this integral part of Chatham's architectural heritage while offering luxury residential accommodations.

Design/Physical (OHA Reg. 9/06):

The building known today (2017) as Queen's Court apartments, and best known locally as The Canada Business College, was also known for many years as the local O.P.P. Office. This structure was built in 1905, and is in the Dutch Renaissance style of Richardsonian Romanesque, popular at the time but relatively rare in our area. It is a three story structure, with a raised basement, and is rectangular in shape. Part of the Dutch Renaissance architecture are two large square towers with domed roofs, which anchor the front facade. Between the towers, at the front of the building is a large verandah that once had a balcony on the second floor covered by a large awning. Today the balcony does not exist. Above that, rising above the shed roof, is an ogee-arched dormer that is characteristic of the Dutch Renaissance Style. On the side facades are rows of windows on the basement and first two floors, situated between pilasters, which form long columns supporting a corbelled roofline, and which extend through the roofline. The only modern addition (exterior) to the building is the rear stairwell, added during O.P.P. years. Otherwise, Queen's Court apartments present the same basic appearance today that it did when it was first opened on January 1, 1906.

Contextual (OHA Reg. 9/06):

The Canada Business College (Queen's Court) building occupies only part of what was once a prominent, gore-shaped property where the "Old Athletic Grounds" was situated. The baseball diamond located here was very well known in its day, and once hosted Rube Waddell, who later was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1903, just before the College was constructed, the property was subdivided into 40 lots, and College Street (named because of the Canada Business College, which was going to be built beside it) was created, which gave access to a quarter of the lots. Today this building still occupies a prominent spot on this part of Queen Street. College Street still reminds the 21st century observer that the Business College once existed on that site.

Any person may, within 30 days of the date of this Notice, serve on the Clerk, a Notice of Objection in writing, setting out the objection and all relevant facts. Where a Notice of Objection has been served, the Council of the Municipality of Chatham-Kent shall refer the matter to the Conservation Review Board for a hearing.

Dated at the Municipality of Chatham-Kent this 3rd day of November, 2017.



In the Matter of the Ontario Heritage Act

Notice of Intent to Designate

The Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O., 1990, Chapter 0.18 as amended, provides that the Municipal Council may pass a by-law designating property within the boundaries of the municipality to be of cultural heritage value and interest. The Council of the Municipality of Chatham-Kent hereby gives Notice of Intent to designate the following:

Description of Property:

The property is located at 14240 Talbot Trail in the village of Palmyra, Orford Township, Chatham-Kent, legally described as Part of Lot 71, STR (South Talbot Road). The property consists of a c. 1900 Queen Anne cottage of frame construction with a somewhat later addition to the rear.

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest:

Historical/Associative (OHA Reg. 9/06):

The property was in the ownership of the Irvine family from at least 1907 until the mid-1940s, belonging successively to Gerard, William, and finally, Clayton. From 1945 until 1970, the property was owned by Marion Scott who ran the village post office, grocery, and an ice cream parlour from the front room of the house.

Design/Physical (OHA Reg. 9/06):

The property contains is an excellent and well preserved example of a late c. 1900 Queen Anne cottage. The original block of the house features a steep-pitched front gable façade with decorative shingle and clapboard cladding, a veranda with bargeboard trim, and rectangular, diamond shaped, and bay windows.

Contextual (OHA Reg. 9/06):

The house is a landmark along the south side of Talbot Trail as you enter Palmyra from the east. This house, in conjunction with another very similar house immediately to the west, and a restored octagonal barn (Crazy 8 Barn) two lots west, creates a colourful, visible, and interesting small heritage cluster along a flat, open stretch of the Talbot Trail.

Description of Heritage Attributes/Character Defining Elements:

Exterior:

  • Roofline
  • Wooden "horsehead and circles" gable crest decoration
  • Brick chimney (rear)
  • Dormers, east and west exposure
  • Footprint
  • Frieze and soffit trim
  • Window placement throughout
  • Window frames and exterior trim throughout
  • Front & east side door placement
  • Front and east side door frames and trim
  • Wooden front door with inset, moulded panels and central framed glass panel
  • Shaped wooden "fish scale" shingle cladding in upper gables
  • Wooden clapboard siding-main block of house
  • Wooden board & batten siding on rear (north) addition
  • Diamond shaped window next to front door, front (north) façade
  • Front veranda including:
    • Wooden spindled and bracketed frieze decoration (gingerbread)
    • Tongue and groove ceiling
    • Wooden shaped support post
    • Bead-decorated wooden railing and post
  • Suspended bay window (front/north façade)
  • Three-section window, east façade
  • Wooden drip edge and baseboard
  • Round "port hole" window on north façade

Contextual:

Key elements of 14240 Talbot Trail that support its contextual significance are:

  • Location in relation to other period buildings
  • Proximity to the highway creating a high level of visibility especially to westbound highway travellers

Any person may, within 30 days of the date of this Notice, serve on the Clerk, a Notice of Objection in writing, setting out the objection and all relevant facts. Where a Notice of Objection has been served, the Council of the Municipality of Chatham-Kent shall refer the matter to the Conservation Review Board for a hearing.

Dated at the Municipality of Chatham-Kent this 3rd day of November, 2017.